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I have been doing dialogues with myself, and have had some quite startling realizations. It is clearly a very powerful tool!

[ Randy A ] >

Archive for: Wendy Dolber

+ What are we teaching our children about work?

[ Posted on 10.13.2017 ]

What are you broadcasting to your kids about work? Perhaps you love your job and regularly share accomplishments around the dinner table. Your kids are used to seeing you energetically tackle the workweek, coming home with plenty of energy for family time. Or, work is a black hole that you disappear into each Monday, stumbling home on Friday exhausted and disgruntled. Whether you love your job or hate it (and everything in between), what do you want to teach your children about work with your attitude and behavior? And if you have an unhappy relationship with work, can you really isolate that from your family? How much energy do you have for them when you are shut down over something that went wrong on the job? What are you teaching them about how you feel about them? Maybe you don’t have the perfect job. Maybe your boss can be a…

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+ And Now A Word About Mindlessness

[ Posted on 09.10.2017 ]

  I’m about to admit something that could be potentially embarrassing but I do it gladly for all those who have had similar experiences. And, by the way, I’m not embarrassed – just bemused about the sometimes depth of my mindlessness. Last week I believed I locked myself out of my car, only to realize after AAA showed up and opened the door, that the key was not in fact in the car as I believed. To get to this point, I had to forget a whole raft of things related to the key. That I had put in it my purse. That I took my purse with me when we went to get ice cream. That I put the purse down on the floor while I ate the ice cream (so good!) and by the way, NEVER put your purse on the floor. That I walked away from the…

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+ You and me and the Game of Thrones

[ Posted on 08.13.2017 ]

Families are notorious for typecasting. Sara is the negotiator but Robert knows has to get things done. Mary could sit and draw all day but Bill is a born salesman. Jack is great at sports but Sasha has a flare for writing. Part of growing up is finding out what we are good at and maybe not so good at. Certainly if no one tells us, we figure it out for ourselves as we try to figure ourselves out. Then we grow up and guess what? That typecasting tends to stick. We think of our family members as we have always thought of them and we think of ourselves the way we always have. Of course, we do grow and change. I used to think of myself as a physically weak because I was sick a lot as a child. That myth got blasted when I backpacked in Europe in…

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+ Is my emotional response to pain controllable?

[ Posted on 06.12.2017 ]

June is National Migraine and Headache Awareness Month!  According to Migraine.com, there are about 100 million people with headaches in the U.S.; about 37 million of these people have migraines. The World Health Organization suggests that 18 percent of women and 7 percent of men in the U.S. suffer from migraines.  After back pain, which accounts for 27% of pain; headache pain accounts for 15%. Apparently we are a nation in pain. According to paindoctor.com, “pain affects more people in the US than diabetes heart disease and cancer combined. A whopping 126 million or 55% of all adults experienced pain in the past three months. And that’s just the pain that’s reported. I remember having migraines when I was in my late teens. There was little else I could do than lie in bed until it passed. Lucky for me, it was episodic and I never had to deal with them…

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+ Can we talk to the dead?

[ Posted on 05.22.2017 ]

On a windy hill in Japan where the 100 year-old city of Otsuchi used to be, there stands an old fashioned English styled phone booth. Inside is a black rotary phone on a wooden shelf. It is connected to nothing. Or is it? People come from miles away – thousands of them – to talk to their loved ones lost in the tsunami of 2011. They weep. They give the update of their lives. They apologize for lost opportunities. They send hopes that the loved one is eating, staying warm, finding their way home. Does it help? For some families, it is the first time they talked about the loved one as a family – the first time a child has even spoken at all. For Itaru Sasaki, who erected the phone booth after the death of his beloved cousin even before the tsunami wiped away 19250 people – “Because my…

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The principle of The Option Method is to take unhappiness from that vague cloud of confusion and tha…

The principle of The Option Method is to take unhappiness from that vague cloud of confusion and that which just happens to you by fate and bad genetics or whatever, and bring it down to the real dynamics that cause emotions, your beliefs and your judgments, and that people who want to get happier and happier don’t need to do this all the time.

[ Bruce Di Marsico ]